Quick Update

I finished moving all the old entries from my mobileme site. They go back to last February, when I first came to Korea, but I couldn’t find a way to import the blog and keep it archived by month. So, all the posts are in “November.” You can go back to the beginning by clicking on “November” and then a list of entries should come up. I had fun reading through them and re-living the first couple of days on Jeju.

Side note: One of the little things that I really love about Korea is that you have the option of smoking in the bathroom.

By that I mean on the toilet.

Most bathrooms have a thoughtfully-placed ashtray (which is often a beer can with the top cut off) right there at seat-level. I don’t actually smoke (at least not anymore..not for five or six years) nor have I ever wished I could smoke while sitting on the toilet, but it’s so nice and accomodating.

That just kills me.

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Spring Is In the Air…Along With A Coating Of Yellow Dust

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Well, I’m sitting here on Thursday night, contemplating the fact that another week has gone by here on Jeju. I’ve been feeling a bit tired lately, and so I stayed home during the week. Which could also be a way of saying I’ve just been lazy.

I’m not sure whether my persistent sore throat is due to a cold or constant yelling. It’s getting to the point where I have to decide during class whether getting the kids to do what I want is worth the strain on my throat/voice. I’ve been experimenting with different vocal ranges and trying to use different parts of my throat to produce the desired shouting effect with limited success. I’ve also been drinking lots of tea.

Today was cookie-making day. I am beginning to dread these “immersion days” since they invariably involve a lot of chaos, mess, shouting, and confusion. Apparently Koreans don’t really make cookies, so the school’s kitchen didn’t exactly have an excess of baking supplies. We only had 4 pans, a few sheets of wax paper, 2 rolling pins, 6 cookie cutters, tables that are 2 feet high to work on, about 40 kids, and 40 minutes. Also, the lunch ladies needed us out of there and the place had to be clean for snack time, and THEN we had to take turns going back in and baking the cookies in one tiny oven with one rack and no way of telling when it was preheated. Does baking with kids still sound like fun? When the kids weren’t looking, I just cut out as many cookies as I could.  At the end of the day, each kid got a little baggie with 2 little cookies in it. We kind of shortchanged them on the cookies, but there weren’t enough of them that had been baked yet.

One of my kids threw a completely irrational temper tantrum when it was time to go home. You may be thinking “aren’t temper tantrums irrational by nature?” Nope, sometimes they make sense. In this case, Andrew (the biggest kid in class, which makes me forget that he’s only five) stole Megan’s fuzzy animal that she brings every day. It obviously belongs to her. So he took it, she (of course) cried, I told him to give it back, and he proceeded to wail and scream at the top of his lungs and refuse to get ready to go home. I decided that not putting up with his ridiculous behavior was the way to go, so I told him that if he didn’t get OFF THE TABLE and go home, he would have to sleep in the school all night.

Apparently hearing the ear-piercing screams coming from my classroom, Agnes came and at least got this kid to go home. My co-teacher Caroline told me that working at Bambini is a very effective form of birth control. So,between the three of us, we are probably saving the world from at least 6 babies.

Now about the Yellow Dust..supposedly Jeju doesn’t have as much of a problem from the dust as the mainland, but I could see it all over my scooter the other morning, so it’s definitely in the air and is probably what’s irritating my throat.

I’m pretty excited about research for my first Jeju Weekly story. I’m going to the Geomunoreum Lava Tubes on Saturday with a translator to get a tour of the tubes and interview a geologist and the village leader, who is an expert on the lava tubes.  

“Please Don’t Trrow Your Thrash”

My co-teacher noticed this sign as we were sneaking up onto the roof of a neighboring apartment building during our lunch break to read in the sun. This Saturday, I went 4 hour hike as part of the research for my first newspaper story. The story is on Geomunoreum, which is one oreum that actually consists of 9 peaks. Here is a view from the top of one of the peaks.      

The lava tubes running underground create all kinds of strange anomalies, like air currents that come up in different places and create tiny microclimates that are only a few feet apart. Flowers might bloom in one spot but not another, and the leaves on one tree might be blowing and completely still on another. The trees on the mountain are easily uprooted, but continue to live and grow with roots that curl around since they can’t grow into the ground.

 The paper set up a private tour with a translator, which made me wish I could bring the translator, Angela, with me everywhere that I go. Next weekend, I’m going to continue my research by going to the underground lava tubes that are open to the public. I tried to get permission to go to the sections that are closed, but you have to be involved in academic research to do so.

This weekend I just felt really lucky to be here. On Sunday, I met up with a couple of other girls and headed to the beach. Hamdeok beach is about 1/2 hour away. There’s a small section where the foreigners go, and it’s really easy to spot. Koreans stay really covered up….as in, they wear their clothes into the water. There are about 15 other beaches to explore, but that seems to be the one everyone goes to. It’s pretty close, and nicer than Iho beach, which is right in town and about a 5 minute scooter ride away. I go there after work sometimes to watch the sunset since it’s so close but kind of industrial.

I found out today that we have May 21 off, so I think I’m going to plan a trip to Seoul for the long weekend. I don’t think I could handle that amount of population density for more than a day or two so a weekend is perfect. Finally, here is one of my favorite signs. Yeah, they really like pig here.  

Tres Mes Ya?

Have I really been here for three months? Well, almost. I have to say that it definitely feels that way. Time has not been flying by, and a lot has happened in the last three months. I realized how much adjusting I’ve done while sailing down the busy streets of Jeju-Si today on my scooter, which I’ve become a lot more confident on. I love that instead of waiting in slow traffic, I can weave around the cars and drive on the sidewalk to bypass everyone and jump back in after the light. How many times have you gazed longingly at a sidewalk and wished you could do that in a car? I also love that I can park anywhere I feel like throwing down my kickstand…I’m not sure if this scooter lawlessness works the same way back in the US, but I like it!

I joined the food co-op today (which I found completely by accident.). I don’t really get any benefits (well, 2% less on food) but I got a membership card! I also have a few favorite restaurants near my house now. There’s a place near my gym where I can get a salad with raw tuna, a bowl of miso soup, and fried sweet potatoes for about $4.50. The salad comes with rice and a spicy sauce- you put everything in the bowl, douse it with sauce and mix it around. There’s also a vegetarian restaurant near the arboretum (a 5 minute scooter ride away into a land of meticulously labelled gardens and greenery) where dinner is about $5. Everything is served in rustic pottery, and the bi-bim-bap (like the tuna salad, but with vegetables) comes with tea, a salad, soup, tofu, 3 side dishes, kimchi, and rice. I went there after work yesterday and my table was covered with dishes. There’s also a soup place that’s my other favorite.  All of this food seems really healthy. I also discovered that my favorite frozen yogurt (pinkberry-style) is from Korea.

 On Friday, I discovered another Korean holiday that I think we should definitely adopt in the US besides Children’s Day (which everyone gets the day off for)…..Teacher’s Day. We don’t get the day off, but teachers here are showered with presents and of course cake. The Korean teachers get stressed out because they feel the burden of heightened expectations from parents after such blatant bribery. I however got a nice pile of loot. Apparently it used to be pretty out of control, but the government made the  schools put a moratorium of gift giving/teacher bribery because the education system was suffering as a result. I don’t think public school teachers are allowed to accept presents anymore at all.

Today I covered the Seolmundae Halmang Festival at Jeju Stone Park for the paper. I’ve added pictures from the festival to my albums here, and I’m also adding pictures to my Galleries page on Mobileme. The festival celebrated the legend of Seolmundae Halmang, Jeju’s legendary grandmother who created the island but unfortunately fell into a giant soup pot and was unwittingly eaten by her 500 sons. The ceremony was beautiful, beginning with a dance to clear the way for the spirit of the Great Mother to accept the invitation of the people, followed by a mime performance/dance  culminating in paper, representative of silk clothing for the goddess, being offered to get things off to a good start, and then a series of prayers for a good harvest and many children led by a monk and women in traditional brown garb. Then there was a ceremony that involved a lot of chanting and drumming, and an older woman dressed in a traditional costume who I assume was representative of the goddess, although by then my translator had gone so I had to guess. After that, they incorporated a bit of humor into the festival with masks and human puppets. At the end, the life-sized puppets grabbed people’s hands and made everyone join in the dance (even me.) Throughout the festival, they encouraged audience participation and noodle eating, and I was sometimes in danger of being squirted by the teats of the Big Mother.

buddha, wedding, dumplings

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

 We had Friday off in honor of Buddha’s birthday (and according to her “weekend diary,” one of my kids met Buddha!) On Saturday, I went to the Korean-style wedding of two long-term Canadian expats. It was officiated by Koreans, and the bride wore a traditional Korean wedding dress. It was much simpler than most western weddings (except for the fact that it was in Korean, required a translator, and involved a complicated series of formalities that were never done at the right time during the ceremony, which led to the bride and groom being scolded, repeatedly. “Ok bow…”NO NOT NOW!”) and as per Korean custom, we sat on the floor. Afterward, the reception took the form of an open mike gathering, which took a hilarious turn when one thoroughly soju-soused guest, eager to share tales of burgeoning homosexuality run wild on an island of (apparently) closeted Koreans, seized the mike and regaled everyone with thoroughly explicit tales of late-night encounters around the island while everyone basically squirmed in their seats.

I also turned in my first student evaluations. I decided to be honest about some of my worse students.  I get the feeling that I’m not supposed to actually criticize any of them, but some of the boys are really bad (evil, methinks), and that keeps them from doing well in class. Then again, they are 5-7 years old, as I keep reminding myself.

This weekend, there is a volleyball tournament that pretty much everyone on the island is looking forward to. It’s really an excuse to spend a weekend on the beach with a bunch of people and almost everyone plans to camp there. You can just throw your tent down anywhere you feel like it here. There’s a surprising amount of freedom on Jeju, and a lack of crime as well as drugs. It’s kind of like being in the fifities or sixties (well, the sixties without any drugs). I discovered a new favorite food last night as I was dropping my scooter off to get the muffler fixed- Mandu (Korean dumplings.). mmmmmm mmmmannnduuu.  

Marado

Thursday, June 3, 2010

The last few weeks have been a continuation of this strange, exciting new life I’m finding myself in. I played in a volleyball tournament last weekend (my team came in somewhere in the middle, amazingly. I’m not very good- surprise, surprise. But I at least I can serve the ball…kindof ). My first article was just published in Jeju Weekly, and I spent yesterday (we had the day off for Election Day) on a small islet off the south coast of Jeju called Marado.

Marado is home to 40 people and takes about 45 minutes to walk around. It has a Buddhist temple, a Christian church shaped like a submarine, a chocolate shop, many, many noodle shops, a rock jutting out into the ocean that the locals used to perform sacrifices (of what? still a mystery) on, and a field of solar panels (very cool, I assume it makes electricity so the islanders can be somewhat self-sufficient). Last week I also had to write evaluations for all the kids…..glad that’s over. I only see some of them twice a week for 50 minutes so assessment was a bit difficult. Others (the evil misbehavers) are quite memorable. Looking forward to this weekend and a quadruple birthday party/camping on the beach. June already?!

Less Squid, More Blog

This is the summation of my thoughts tonight. Viva la blog.

 

Jeju Weekly…2 articles published.“Honoring Jeju’s Grandmother” http://www.jejuweekly.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=751 “Walking Through the Volcano” http://www.jejuweekly.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=773

Also…FIELD TRIP!! That means sleepy bus rides with kids songs on the radio, lunging at kids’ lunches with chop sticks, and hanging out with my favorite girls, who attach themselves to me like pigtailed barnacles and pretend to eat me because they are plants and I am a bug while I protest “I’m a TEACHER! Not a bug!” with the same intonations as “I am not an animal!” Today I bought a modest Korean-style bathing suit as I plan to start swimming laps in the community pool instead of going to the un-air conditioned gym, which has become unbearable and is akin to some form of torture thus I stopped going 2 weeks ago. My new bathing suit does NOT have a skirt (it was hard to find one without) but DOES have tiny molded cups in the chest that stick out quite perplexingly when placed on a non-Korean sized body. Need to alter it…but how?!

Learning Korean and Avoiding Fan Death

Saturday, June 26, 2010

Today I made some extra money by appearing as Resident Native English Speaker (I actually did nothing except listen to kids stumble over books in English in front of a crowded room and stamp these little booklets) at another English school. At this particular school, teachers go tothe students' houses for lessons, so the annual Market Day gives them a chance for them to get together and pretend to buy things with fake $1 bills.

I was planning to head down to Seogwipo (“Soggy-po” as the locals pronounce it, which has a distinct flavor that suits its southerly locale) this afternoon for a vigil/information session about a proposed naval base on Jeju (bad for coral, bad for “peace island,” bad for lots of reasons), but I was too exhausted to make the trek down there and then get back in time to watch the World Cup game at 11. Korea has been doing well and it’s sort of an event to go watch the games, even though I am normally the world’s least enthusiastic sports fan.

Koreans are just so proud and excited, it warms the heart.Well, that and the free-flowing soju.

I’m making a lot of progress with Korean. I don’t think I’ll try and learn anything more than some basic vocabulary words while I’m here, just because I’m not sure that the time and effort is matched by its general usefulness outside of Korea. I have managed to learn how to read, though, which is helpful since I can at least pick out words that are English cognates. Ahh, and the other reason that I was so tired today….Jeju mosquitoes! They seem to have a magical and devious ability to invade my apartment en masse even though I have screens.

My fan is equipped with a 2-hour timer to prevent death.  There is a theory widely accepted as fact in Korea (and nowhere else in the world) that a fan, left running all night as they often are by reasonable people wanting to be nicely chilled or at the very least not stifling hot in a nearly-windowless room such as mine causes certain death by stealing all the oxygen from sleeping people. Here are just a few theories as to exactly HOW fans pose an imminent threat:

  • That an electric fan creates a vortex, which sucks the oxygen from the enclosed and sealed room and creates a partial vacuum inside. This explanation violates the principle of conservation of matter, as indoor fans are not nearly powerful enough to change the air pressure by any significant amount.

 

  • That an electric fan chops up all the oxygen particles in the air leaving none to breathe. This explanation violates mass conservation and well-known properties of molecules and gases, particularly that known breakdown energy of oxygen molecules lies in the ultraviolet range. It also ignores the nearly universal human tendency to wake up whilst being suffocated in a moment of sleep. Moreover, the theory makes no justifications for how and why a person will not suffocate whilst awake in a room which contains an operating fan.

 

  • The fan uses up the oxygen in the room and creates fatal levels of carbon dioxide. An electric motor does not function by combustion; unlike a candle, the electric motor consumes energy supplied by the electricity, not from a fuel. The fan motor's commutator does produce a small amount of ozone during normal operation, however most AC powered fans use induction motors, whose brushless design eliminates any possible ozone production. Ozone can be fatal in high concentrations, but any normal room would never allow the gas to build up to lethal levels.

 

  • That if the fan is put directly in front of the face of the sleeping person, it will suck all the air away, preventing one from breathing. This explanation ignores both the fact that a fan attracts as much air to a given spot as it is removing from it, and the fact that most people point a fan towards themselves when using one, which causes air to move past the face but does not change the amount of air present.

  I would like to report I remain very much alive after several nights with my new fan.

Monsoon Season Hath Begun

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

No. more. rain. I am melting into a sticky puddle. Only 3 more weeks of hot, humid rain. Side note: apparently I live next to a small pond full of insane frogs. It sounds like they live in my bathroom (all 500 of them). On a related note, anyone know how to bomb a frog pond?

Untitled Update

Wednesday, April 20, 2010

After a brief hiatus, my Jeju blog is again up and running with a new web address. The only feature that has been lost is the ability to RSS subscribe, so for my loyal followers, I will send a quick email to let you know when I’ve posted a new entry.  

I’ve been pretty busy in the last two weeks or so since I last posted an entry. I’ve really missed writing, and I plan to write much more often than I used to.The weather is getting warmer and I’ve been to the beach and frolicked in fields of yellow rapeseed flowers. They grow and harvest them here as crops, so this time of year the island is awash in beauteous flora with a distinctly practical purpose.

  I also got a phone a couple of weeks ago, which was a huge step. After living without one for a month and a half, this newfangled communication technology aka “talky-box” was a bit overwhelming, but I soon embraced the convenience of being able to, you know…make contact when not near a computer.  

This weekend I am going to begin research on my first story as a reporter for Jeju Weekly, the island’s only English newspaper. I’ll be writing an in-depth article about the lava tubes, which have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. More on that later, as well as a web link so you can read my story when it comes out at the end of May. 

Trip to Psyche World

Tuesday, March 30, 2010  

I think I've figured out that mornings are the best time to write. Speaking of writing, I think that using my blog more like a journal will help me keep to my more general yearly goal of developing a writing portfolio. I finally realized that putting off my writing projects because I need to create the right space is just another way of procrastinating.

I’ve been thinking that I need to turn my balcony/porch into an indoor garden with a table and chair before I can tackle any serious writing projects, but then I realized that it was just my sneaky subconscious creating another barrier to getting down and doing the work that writing requires. I’m glad that I brought my copy of “Writing Down the Bones”- I definitely need to re-read it, especially the part where she insists on the importance of writing every day.

Last week was rather uneventfully interesting. I went to the dentist, which was fun. The dentist was the only one in the office who spoke English, and I’m still not sure of the name, but I emerged with very clean teeth, almost no bill (thanks, socialized health care that includes dentistry!) and a huge amount of worry off my mind (I had been afraid to go since it’s been so long.

On Friday, my school took a field trip to “Psyche World,” a weird theme park that had dead butterflies, glass flower gardens, a hall of mirrors, a sad petting zoo featuring unneutered, smelly tomcats on leashes, and a whole room of diaramas featuring smartly costumed cockroaches enacting scenes throughout various time periods. There were Roman cockroaches fighting little lions in the Coloseum, Medieval cockroaches in little capes and suits of armor, and even Egyptian cockroaches busily building the pyramids. There were also modern cockroaches building things on construction sites. Oh, to have had my camera.

Then it was time for lunch. I truly had no idea that a Korean field trip is basically a feeding frenzy. The kids’ parents pack XL lunches, and the teachers walk around with chopsticks, hover above the students, and then swoop and nab whatever they want. I felt a little weird participating in this strange custom, but one of my favorite students’ mom had made a special lunch for me of delicious homemade kimbap and an orange so I didn't actually have to scavenge that much.  

Today after school I’m off to pick up my new scooter! I bought a used orange 90cc scooter. Now I have to learn how to ride it in order to get it home….  

Week Three

Monday, March 22, 2010

I would say that it’s hard to believe it’s been three weeks, but it’s not. It feels like months…in a good way. Spring is here, and the island is getting beautiful. Teaching is becoming easier, too. I’m finding a lot of things to do on the weekends, and I started taking a yoga class during the week. I’m not sure if I’ll even have time to do all the things I want to while I’m here.

On Saturday, I took a bus to the southern end of the island where there is a town called Seogwipo. It’s a lot smaller than Jeju City, and easier to navigate. The bus ride went over the mountain. It was a pretty ride, but the weather started getting bad so I wasn’t able to get a lot of pictures. I went to see Jeungmun Falls, which happens to be the only waterfall in Asia that falls directly into the sea. The next day I went hiking on an Oreum with a group of Koreans. It was interesting to hang out with some Korean people, because I haven’t really spent time with anyone other than the teachers here. My new friend Tim, another American from Minnesota, was invited to join the hiking club by one of the teachers at his school. At the top of the hill, we had a lovely little repast of kimbap, fresh octopus that one of the hikers had caught the day before, tofu and mageoli (sp?), a Korean fermented rice wine. After the hike, we went out to lunch (yes, lunch again) and then Tim and I spent the rest of the day exploring Seogwipo. The weather was perfect for a change, the blossoms were blooming, and we went to see another beautiful waterfall and then walked along the harbor and out to a small island.

Later, we met other teachers and hung out before heading back over the mountain on the bus. I found out where the scuba diving classes are- I think I might take a course there later this spring/summer. Today, I’m off to the dentist after school. I’m actually pretty excited about getting a checkup for the first time in years (it’s ridiculously cheap here) See my “albums” page for pictures of Seogwipo…