Second Week On Jeju

Sunday, March 7, 2010

The rain continues this weekend as it has throughout the week. I honestly can’t believe I’ve only been here  for a week and a half- it feels like it’s been a month. I really got thrown into a whole new life here pretty quickly without much of an adjustment period, but I’m kind of glad that it worked out that way. I’m finally getting into a routine at work (or at least getting a sense of what my routine will by like. My kids are adorable and, for the most part, pretty well-behaved. And if they aren’t then well, I have to remind myself that they are only five years old.

There is a nice view of Mt. Halla from my classroom window. Going to stores and restaurants and finding what I need is getting a little easier. I discovered Kimbap (kind of like Korean sushi). I can get it at the corner store for about $.80! Teaching is so much easier than I expected- all I have to do is follow their workbooks and make sure they do their homework (that’s right…the kindergartners have homework! Their constant need for attention and sharpened pencils is the most demanding aspect of my job. I love the small classes, though. A lot of other teachers here have much bigger classes (my biggest class has 8 students).

 I realized this week that being here just doesn’t feel as strange as it should. Maybe it’s because I have access to almost all of the same things that I did at home. I even watch the Daily Show every night and listen to NPR. I’ve been thinking a lot about how the internet is changing our conception of home and making it more difficult to actually separate ourselves from it. If I cut the cord and really disconnected from my life in the US, I think I would be having a much different experience. In a way, part of me is a little disappointed that the culture shock has been so mild, but there’s also no way that I’ll fight the natural  impulse to make my life here as similar to my life in the US as possible. In a lot of ways, I’m better off here. I have healthcare, access to extremely low-cost dental care, and an easy job that pays well. I’m also a lot more active- I’ve been walking everywhere (except for when I take dirt-cheap cabs) and I climbed a volcanic peak yesterday to take a few photos despite the rain.  Oh, and it’s also beautiful here (as soon as you get out of Jeju City). I also have time to focus on photography and hopefully writing this year. So….mission: make life in Korea like life in Vermont. Step 1: while at home, subsist on a diet of yogurt, cereal, toast, egg whites, and coffee. Step 2: acquire Golden Retriever. Yes, you read that correctly. Following the spirit of quickly jumping into life here, I have decided to adopt Goldie, a poor lost Golden Retriever who happened to be at a local shelter. I still haven’t met her since the shelter is only staffed once a week for 2 hours, but she appears to be a Korean mini-Finn. I think she might still be a puppy. I’ll find out next Saturday! I think Finn will be psyched to meet the new addition to our golden retriever family (John, if you’re reading this, I hope you are, too!) She needed to be rescued quickly, as she only had a day left to live when I read about her and quickly emailed shelter volunteers. No time to consult! It just felt like the right thing to do, and I was happy that fate seemed to have tossed me a new dog. If I see any other Goldens at the shelter(which is unlikely) there’s nothing I can do. I’m not planning on starting my own chapter of Golden Retriever Rescue of Korea.  

Today, I’m off to the Five Day Market with one of my co-workers. It’s still drizzling, but I plan on taking some photos there and hopefully acquiring some cool stuff for my apartment. I’ll add photos to yesterday’s (March 6) album.   I’ve been listening to Johnny Cash American III: Solitary Man and IV: The Man Comes Around all morning, which I haven’t listened to in a long time. It’s hitting me in a whole new way. Somehow it all seems sad, tearfully beautiful, and yet not morose. I am oddly uplifted.  

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