Saving the Eames House

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Unfortunately,  the Eames family appears to have run into hard times. The Eames Foundation is selling these 4 original limited-edition prints to help preserve  Charles’ and Ray’s historic mid-century modern home in LA. For every $75 print sold, Herman Miller and Vitra will provide matching donations.

How often does owning a rare piece of artwork also give you a chance to play a part in architectural history? If you haven’t seen the house, it is super cool.
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P.S. apparently there is also an Eames documentary, The Architect & The Painter. Have you seen it yet?

{Images via Eames House 250}

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Mechanical Biology

The 1926 illustration “Man as Industrial Palace” appears in the new monograph “Fritz Kahn – Man Machine.” Originally it appeared in Kahn’s “Life of Man, Vol. III.”

The 1926 illustration “Man as Industrial Palace” appears in the new monograph “Fritz Kahn – Man Machine.” Originally it appeared in Kahn’s “Life of Man, Vol. III.”

These visualizations of the human body as a modernist “industrial palace” by Fritz Kahn were meant to be instructive, developed to educate the public about human health in the 1920’s.

Industrial and technological imagery are juxtaposed with organic, sometimes even sensuous forms in which the complex structure of the human body is rendered into cold, lifeless machinery. Kahn’s illustrations reflect a world that was rapidly shifting to a “new nature” in which people could now fly, voices could be heard and recorded, and work was made increasingly more efficient.

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The speed of thought, 1943

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The effect of sunlight, 1940

Das Leben des Menschen (The Life of Man) was an encyclopedic work of 1600 pages and 1200 illustrations depicting biology as industrial and mechanical processes, adopting avant-garde visual techniques and contemporary styles such as Neue Sachlichkeit, Dada, Surrealism, and Constructivist photomontage.

Ever-concerned with de-mystifying the miracle of life with easily comprehensible words and pictures, Kahn wrote “The cell state is a republic under the hereditary hegemony of the mind’s aristocracy….its economic system is a strict communism.” Unsurprisingly, his books were placed on the Nazi “list of harmful and unwanted writings” and publicly burned. His medical license was revoked, and Kahn (a Jew) was forced to emigrate — first to Palestine, then Paris and eventually, with help from Albert Einstein, the United States.

“Fairytale journey along the bloodstream – Entering a glandular cavity with an idealized cell-scape,” illustration by Arthur Schmitson for Kahn’s “Life of Man, Vol. II,” 1924

“Fairytale journey along the bloodstream – Entering a glandular cavity with an idealized cell-scape,” illustration by Arthur Schmitson for Kahn’s “Life of Man, Vol. II,” 1924

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Fritz Kahn, Man in Structure in Function (Fig. 208), 1943

Here, the reach of an arm longing for a final touch while saying goodbye is shown as an extension of a mechanical body composed of nothing more than discrete parts and electrical impulses. The accompanying text explains the functional analogy:

 “Man and machine exhibit far­reaching similarities. Both derive their energy from the combustion of carbon, which they obtain from plants. Man, the weaker machine, utilizes fresh plants for fuel, while the locomotive, a stronger machine, uses fossilized plants in the form of coal.”

Raoul Hausmann, Dada (Collage for the First International Dada Fair in Berlin), 1920

Raoul Hausmann, Dada (Collage for the First International Dada Fair in Berlin), 1920

Kahn drew on previous and contemporary analogies between functional anatomy and technology as well as themes of modernity present in contemporary art (such as Raoul Hausmann’s Dada collage, above.) The mechanized battles of the First World War (and the widespread use of protheses thereafter) had helped to produce a man­-machine analogue that made Kahn’s illustrations possible.

Forgotten for many years after being exiled by the Third Reich, Fritz Kahn’s work is now being rediscovered by historians, artists, and designers.

The intertwining of science, art and technology: An animated and interactive installation based on the poster of the same title by Fritz Kahn from 1927.

Les Diners de Gala: Dali’s Cookbook of Food, Art and Surrealism

“One can chose not to eat, one cannot accept to eat poorly” – Salvador Dalí

Inspiration for a Thanksgiving Feast?

With the holidays coming up (ahem *cough cough*) I thought it was a good time to bring attention to one of my all-time coveted items: a cookbook celebrating gastronomy and passionate, decadent consumption of food and art featuring elaborate food still lifes, original drawings and paintings by Salvador Dalí.

In 1973 Les Diners de Gala (Gala’s Dinners) was published as a collaboration between Dalí  and a “secret” chef in collaboration with some of the top French restaurants of the time. In true Dali fashion, Les Diners de Dali moves between ‘sado-masochistic pleasure’, ‘acute sybaritism’, Rabelaisian scatology, religious ecstasy, and anaesthetic asceticism.”

Nocturnal Cravings

“Nocturnal Cravings”—Chapter 11: sweets and desserts.

The book also contains nuggets of information such as the following: “I attribute capital esthetic and moral values to food in general, and to spinach in particular.  The opposite of shapeless spinach, is armor.  I love eating suits of arms, in fact I love all shell fish…food that only a battle to peel makes it vulnerable to the conquest of our palate.”

Sodomized entrees

“Sodomized Entrees”—Chapter 4: meats.

In conjunction with the release of the book Dalí also produced a suite called Les Diners De Gala (Released in 1977). The 12 lithograph suite is a surrealist twist on some of Dalí’s favorite meals. These works are a result of Dalí experimenting with mixed media and they are often regarded as some of Dalí’s most unique prints.

“Les Cannibalismes de L’Automne”

With 136 recipes in 12 categories, the collection of strange recipes includes an entire chapter on aphrodisiacs, correct use of atteletes (meat jewellery) and sketches of limbless dwarves eating eggs, among other things.

“Soft Watches Half Asleep”—Chapter 11: sweets and desserts.

 

“The I Eat Gala’s”—Chapter 10: aphrodisiacs.

Here is a newsreel from 1941, in which Salvador Dali designs and hosts a party held in the Bali Room of the Hotel Del Monte, Monterey, California. The event was titled Night in a Surrealist Forest and it was a fund raiser to help European artists displaced by the war.

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, here is a recipe from Les Diners de Gala for Young Turkey with Roquefort (after the jump):

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The Little Black Jacket

How does personality transform fashion? I’ve always been fascinated by the indefinable ways that the same piece of clothing just looks different on everyone. The slope of a shoulder, the way that fabric drapes and clings in different places;  even the attitude of the person wearing it can completely change the way something looks, like an unconscious and purely physical interpretation of thread and cloth.

The Little Black jacket features a simple black tweed jacket worn over 100 different ways on over 100 distinctly different personalities. Shot by Karl Lagerfeld himself, and styled by Carine Roitfeld, The Little Black Jacket has his favorite muses wearing the label’s iconic jacket.

Rather than a book-long ad campaign for Chanel, it seems to be more of a study on the transformative power of personality on fashion.

(The Little Black Jacket book $55)

via {Honestly WTF}

Slit Camera Photography by Jay Mark Johnson

‘claudio, stella e farfalla’, cetona, italy

California-based artist Jay Mark Johnson has created a series of time-based images that appear to be photoshopped; however, the effect is achieved through a specially built slit camera that emphasizes time over space, effectively condensing motion into sweeping bands of color.

It gets crazier- an object is recognized by the camera according to the rate of movement as opposed to distance or size, so that viewing the image by scanning from left to right is essentially like going backward in time.

The project began as an accidental effect while Johnson was taking high-resolution panoramas with an US85,000 rotating slit-scan camera. He noticed the accidental effects the device was capable of, and began stopping the rotation and focusing in on one small area. By controlling the period of time that the camera registers a scene (which is represented visually by one vertical sliver) Johnson can capture the moving subjects line-by-line. As a result, slow-moving objects appear stretched, while faster objects are condensed.

Johnson’s work strives to deepen our understanding of reality by

showing us that what we see is a product of our cultural traditions and means of perception.'”

‘swept away #2’ from the belgrade series

‘bauen wohnen streifen #4’ from the hamburg series
‘carbon dating #1’ from the hazard series

‘constatino sott’ acqua 2′

‘bauen wohnen streifen #4’ from the hamburg series

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Priscilla Electric Lodge #47-0

via {huffington post}

Russian Street Artist Turns Derelict Buildings Into Whimsical Creatures

‘the keeper of the keys’ by nomerz

‘glutton’, st. petersburg

a detail showing ‘glutton’s’ teeth made from trash

Russian street artist Nikita Nomerz uses graffiti to repurpose abandoned buildings, trees, and debris in various cities including his home town of Nizhniy Novgorod. Nomerz’s project involves traveling around Russia on a quest to find and transform these unwanted structures into strange, quirky characters.

A video showing the making of the ‘keeper of the keys’

via {designboom}

Rivers and Abstractions

These beautiful and abstract images are in fact rivers flowing down the sides of Iceland’s many volcanos. Photographer Andre Ermolaev explains that  “it is an inexpressible combination of colors, lines, and patterns. The photo represents the mouth of the river falling into the ocean.

“A little bit upstream there is a yellow-colored brook flowing into the river, but yellow currents fail to mix with the main water flow.  One can estimate the scale judging by the car tracks that are clearly seen on the black sand. This is just a river, just a volcano, just our planet.”

Indeed.

via {my modern met}