Spring Is In the Air…Along With A Coating Of Yellow Dust

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Well, I’m sitting here on Thursday night, contemplating the fact that another week has gone by here on Jeju. I’ve been feeling a bit tired lately, and so I stayed home during the week. Which could also be a way of saying I’ve just been lazy.

I’m not sure whether my persistent sore throat is due to a cold or constant yelling. It’s getting to the point where I have to decide during class whether getting the kids to do what I want is worth the strain on my throat/voice. I’ve been experimenting with different vocal ranges and trying to use different parts of my throat to produce the desired shouting effect with limited success. I’ve also been drinking lots of tea.

Today was cookie-making day. I am beginning to dread these “immersion days” since they invariably involve a lot of chaos, mess, shouting, and confusion. Apparently Koreans don’t really make cookies, so the school’s kitchen didn’t exactly have an excess of baking supplies. We only had 4 pans, a few sheets of wax paper, 2 rolling pins, 6 cookie cutters, tables that are 2 feet high to work on, about 40 kids, and 40 minutes. Also, the lunch ladies needed us out of there and the place had to be clean for snack time, and THEN we had to take turns going back in and baking the cookies in one tiny oven with one rack and no way of telling when it was preheated. Does baking with kids still sound like fun? When the kids weren’t looking, I just cut out as many cookies as I could.  At the end of the day, each kid got a little baggie with 2 little cookies in it. We kind of shortchanged them on the cookies, but there weren’t enough of them that had been baked yet.

One of my kids threw a completely irrational temper tantrum when it was time to go home. You may be thinking “aren’t temper tantrums irrational by nature?” Nope, sometimes they make sense. In this case, Andrew (the biggest kid in class, which makes me forget that he’s only five) stole Megan’s fuzzy animal that she brings every day. It obviously belongs to her. So he took it, she (of course) cried, I told him to give it back, and he proceeded to wail and scream at the top of his lungs and refuse to get ready to go home. I decided that not putting up with his ridiculous behavior was the way to go, so I told him that if he didn’t get OFF THE TABLE and go home, he would have to sleep in the school all night.

Apparently hearing the ear-piercing screams coming from my classroom, Agnes came and at least got this kid to go home. My co-teacher Caroline told me that working at Bambini is a very effective form of birth control. So,between the three of us, we are probably saving the world from at least 6 babies.

Now about the Yellow Dust..supposedly Jeju doesn’t have as much of a problem from the dust as the mainland, but I could see it all over my scooter the other morning, so it’s definitely in the air and is probably what’s irritating my throat.

I’m pretty excited about research for my first Jeju Weekly story. I’m going to the Geomunoreum Lava Tubes on Saturday with a translator to get a tour of the tubes and interview a geologist and the village leader, who is an expert on the lava tubes.  

First Day On Jeju

Wednesday, February 20, 2010

Was easily spotted (I was literally the only non-Asian in the entire airport)and picked up at the airport by Jimmy, who works for Jeju ESL Consulting. Flying in over the ocean, I could see a beautiful snow-capped mountain in the middle of the island which I correctly guessed to be Mt. Halla.

As I stepped out of the airport, I was greeted by sunshine, warm salty air, and huge palm trees!

I soon discovered that we were headed not for my new apartment, where I hoped to take my long-awaited shower and maybe a nap, but straight for the school. In fact, after helpfully unloading my bags and carrying them in, Jimmy left both me and my bags at the school.   Struggling to adapt to this unexpectedly rapid introduction to my new job, I tried not to nod off in the cute, colorful office where Agnes, the school director,  excitedly explained my teaching schedule, showed me where my university diploma now hung proudly on the wall, and beamingly asked me if I could observe a few classes today after meeting all the kids in the entire school. I explained that it was close to midnight in US time, and  she kindly postponed the class observation until early tomorrow morning (when apparently I’ll also be meeting all of the parents ).

I didn’t realize that I’d actually be going to the school on the pitifully few days that I have to adjust before I officially start work, but I guess it will be good to get a sense of what the school is like I start teaching.  

I was soon being ferried to my hotel room (I don't actually get to move into my apartment until Friday afternoon) by Lorenzo, a curiously Spanish-named Korean man who also works for the school.  

Later this afternoon, I went for an exploratory walk around Shin-Jeju. It’s not a very scenic town. The buildings are all very modern in a late sixties/seventies concrete kind of way. I think that in order to see the good parts of Jeju (i.e. something that looks like the pictures I saw) I need to get out of town. You can’t really see the ocean from this part of town- maybe you can from my apartment. I did see a tangerine tree full of fruit, though, and the ride from the airport was pretty.  

Korea seems to be full of pleasantly hot and spicy food. I ordered something from a streetside vendor that was a complete mystery (was it fish? Eels? Turned out to be thick noodles and some sort of tofu-like curd) in a delightfully hot, spicy broth. To my surprise, the soup was dumped into a bag and handed to me with chopsticks! So I touted my plastic bag of soup back to the hotel and funneled it into a a bathroom cup.  

Later, I ordered another mystery food at a cafe- it turned out to be cold buckwheat noodles in a *very* hot sauce. The cook handed me a pair of scissors to cut it with and a pair of metal chopsticks to eat it with, which was a challenge. It required a lot of snipping before I could adequately maneuver the chopsticks without sloshing wet noodles all over my face.  

I also attempted to find a power adaptor in a five story Korean department store…without success but with much aimless wandering and halfhearted questioning of salespeople, none of whom spoke English. I gave up after one misguided (by me)  salesperson went over to the store’s computer and googled the word “shape” because he thought that’s what the thing is called after my botched explanation….  

Week Three

Monday, March 22, 2010

I would say that it’s hard to believe it’s been three weeks, but it’s not. It feels like months…in a good way. Spring is here, and the island is getting beautiful. Teaching is becoming easier, too. I’m finding a lot of things to do on the weekends, and I started taking a yoga class during the week. I’m not sure if I’ll even have time to do all the things I want to while I’m here.

On Saturday, I took a bus to the southern end of the island where there is a town called Seogwipo. It’s a lot smaller than Jeju City, and easier to navigate. The bus ride went over the mountain. It was a pretty ride, but the weather started getting bad so I wasn’t able to get a lot of pictures. I went to see Jeungmun Falls, which happens to be the only waterfall in Asia that falls directly into the sea. The next day I went hiking on an Oreum with a group of Koreans. It was interesting to hang out with some Korean people, because I haven’t really spent time with anyone other than the teachers here. My new friend Tim, another American from Minnesota, was invited to join the hiking club by one of the teachers at his school. At the top of the hill, we had a lovely little repast of kimbap, fresh octopus that one of the hikers had caught the day before, tofu and mageoli (sp?), a Korean fermented rice wine. After the hike, we went out to lunch (yes, lunch again) and then Tim and I spent the rest of the day exploring Seogwipo. The weather was perfect for a change, the blossoms were blooming, and we went to see another beautiful waterfall and then walked along the harbor and out to a small island.

Later, we met other teachers and hung out before heading back over the mountain on the bus. I found out where the scuba diving classes are- I think I might take a course there later this spring/summer. Today, I’m off to the dentist after school. I’m actually pretty excited about getting a checkup for the first time in years (it’s ridiculously cheap here) See my “albums” page for pictures of Seogwipo…

48,796 Words To Go

Monday, November 3, 2010  

So, now that I've begun this month-long writing project, I think this blog will be seeing a lot more of me. You see, I am writing, and while I'm rambling on here, important ideas are brewing in my head that will somehow organize themselves. Or at least make someone out there laugh. That's all I hope to achieve, really. I hope that someday, one person reads something in this book that I'm writing and laughs as much as I did when I read the first page of  "A Confederacy of Dunces." Oh, wait… that's actually a pretty lofty aspiration.

I've actually gotten really, really productive since I signed on for this thing. Last night I created an entire new photo site and uploaded hundreds of pictures, cleaned my apartment, called my parents, and decided to join a gym.

Which is funny, because usually I procrastinate about going to the gym. And by procrastinate I mean….I think about joining one.

I did join a gym for a month this summer.

It was in the Vegas Casino, which is also a hotel. The lobby is an assault of gold and glitter, and the elevator to the gym is paneled in fake velvet. In order to get to the floor with the gym, you have to walk right past a bakery, which wasn't really a problem since I'm pretty safe from baked goods as long as I stay at least 50 feet away from them. I joined the gym because it has a pool, which immediately presented a problem.

You are required to shower before and after using the pool, which means increasing my agonizingly uncomfortable public naked time from the 20 seconds it takes me to  change while crouching behind the door of my locker to MINUTES before and after the shower.

I embrace nudity at home. I don't mind being naked in front of one, or maybe even two people. But being naked in a roomful of matter-of-fact strangers really freaks me out. People were just going about their business, heartily slapping on lotion, drying their hair, and happily chatting away while I darted back and forth from locker to shower, clutching my possessions around me like someone in a refugee camp.

I was sure that any minute, my deepest fear would be realized and I would run into one of my students' mothers. So, the gym turned out to be kind of stressful.

I haven't been back since my month ran out. But if I do join tomorrow, I'm going home sweaty.

this is me..don't I look stern? look, there's the computer I should be working on.

 

Trip to Psyche World

Tuesday, March 30, 2010  

I think I've figured out that mornings are the best time to write. Speaking of writing, I think that using my blog more like a journal will help me keep to my more general yearly goal of developing a writing portfolio. I finally realized that putting off my writing projects because I need to create the right space is just another way of procrastinating.

I’ve been thinking that I need to turn my balcony/porch into an indoor garden with a table and chair before I can tackle any serious writing projects, but then I realized that it was just my sneaky subconscious creating another barrier to getting down and doing the work that writing requires. I’m glad that I brought my copy of “Writing Down the Bones”- I definitely need to re-read it, especially the part where she insists on the importance of writing every day.

Last week was rather uneventfully interesting. I went to the dentist, which was fun. The dentist was the only one in the office who spoke English, and I’m still not sure of the name, but I emerged with very clean teeth, almost no bill (thanks, socialized health care that includes dentistry!) and a huge amount of worry off my mind (I had been afraid to go since it’s been so long.

On Friday, my school took a field trip to “Psyche World,” a weird theme park that had dead butterflies, glass flower gardens, a hall of mirrors, a sad petting zoo featuring unneutered, smelly tomcats on leashes, and a whole room of diaramas featuring smartly costumed cockroaches enacting scenes throughout various time periods. There were Roman cockroaches fighting little lions in the Coloseum, Medieval cockroaches in little capes and suits of armor, and even Egyptian cockroaches busily building the pyramids. There were also modern cockroaches building things on construction sites. Oh, to have had my camera.

Then it was time for lunch. I truly had no idea that a Korean field trip is basically a feeding frenzy. The kids’ parents pack XL lunches, and the teachers walk around with chopsticks, hover above the students, and then swoop and nab whatever they want. I felt a little weird participating in this strange custom, but one of my favorite students’ mom had made a special lunch for me of delicious homemade kimbap and an orange so I didn't actually have to scavenge that much.  

Today after school I’m off to pick up my new scooter! I bought a used orange 90cc scooter. Now I have to learn how to ride it in order to get it home….  

Sunshine, and Getting Ready For China

Sunday, July 18, 2010

 

Last night, around sunset, I ventured out of my house expecting to find the usual clouds and imminent rain. I was shocked to discover…that it was kind of a nice night out there. Well, I thought to myself, this brief glimpse of the sun will be nothing but a memory tomorrow. I woke up and it was still there. So I did what every non-mudfester on Jeju would logically do and headed for the beach. I had almost forgotten how nice it is (and so had my skin, apparently. I got a pretty good sunburn). I met a few friends there and went for a lovely swim in the turquoise-green water that makes Hamdeok worth trekking to. Last night, I skipped a beach dance party to stay home, read Lonely Planet Beijing, and plan my trip to China in 3 weeks. I’ve been slightly frustrated that I only have 4 days of vacation plus the weekend, but I have to remind myself that I should be happy that I get to go to China at all, and really, trying to see the whole country is impossible. I really want to go to Guilin (considered one of the most beautiful places on earth, it has been used as the setting for many movies) but it is too far away and too expensive to get there. I will save it for "someday." Instead, I’m going to spend all 5 days in Beijing (no X’ian, either…not enough time) and see the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, etc. There are a few side trips I can take from there, also. Flights were kind of difficult, so I’m also spending a day in Seoul. I found a cool place to stay that is in a traditional courtyard house built in the 1700’s, located in one of Beijing best-preserved hutongs (old neighborhoods made up of small alleys- many of them have been razed to make way for modern buildings).

As Koreans say, Assah!

   

Untitled Update

Wednesday, April 20, 2010

After a brief hiatus, my Jeju blog is again up and running with a new web address. The only feature that has been lost is the ability to RSS subscribe, so for my loyal followers, I will send a quick email to let you know when I’ve posted a new entry.  

I’ve been pretty busy in the last two weeks or so since I last posted an entry. I’ve really missed writing, and I plan to write much more often than I used to.The weather is getting warmer and I’ve been to the beach and frolicked in fields of yellow rapeseed flowers. They grow and harvest them here as crops, so this time of year the island is awash in beauteous flora with a distinctly practical purpose.

  I also got a phone a couple of weeks ago, which was a huge step. After living without one for a month and a half, this newfangled communication technology aka “talky-box” was a bit overwhelming, but I soon embraced the convenience of being able to, you know…make contact when not near a computer.  

This weekend I am going to begin research on my first story as a reporter for Jeju Weekly, the island’s only English newspaper. I’ll be writing an in-depth article about the lava tubes, which have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. More on that later, as well as a web link so you can read my story when it comes out at the end of May. 

” Bad Teacher! “

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

All right, so I’ve been very lazy concerning my blog lately. I do remember making very strong promises to I would write every day, no matter how mundane my activities appear to be. I guess I’ve been sort of afraid that my daily life here won’t be interesting to anyone, so unless I do something special, I haven’t been writing. Then I remembered that the primary reader is most likely my mother, who is the only person in the world who wants to get daily updates about buying weird Korean toothpaste and daily escapades with Korean schoolchildren.

They are quick to notice when I do something wrong, and I am swiftly reprimanded with a chorus of “BAD TEACH-AH!” I usually beat them to it, pointing to myself and saying it in an exaggerated accent. Yesterday I scolded them for forgetting their books, took butterflies away from almost the entire class, and even had Agnes give them a stern talking to. After class, I saw the books neatly stacked on a table near my desk. Bad teacher!

My classes are falling more of a rhythm. Afternoons are easier because the kids are a year or two older and discipline is less of a problem. They stick to their workbooks, and I am basically there to explain how to get through the books. There isn’t enough time for me to present the information in a lesson; they barely have enough time to get through the units on the schedule. My morning reading classes revolve around a reader that is so easy, the kindergartners finish it in less than one class period. I’ve been having them read it over and over all week, working on pronunciation. I realized yesterday that there is room in that class for creativity and lessons that I can plan, so reading class might be my chance to be a real teacher and create some lessons of my own.

This week, I’ve done a few things that are completely uncharacteristic, like play soccer and join a volleyball team… I felt pretty out of place and useless on the soccer field, so I don’t think I’ll go back, but it was fun to check it out. There was only one other girl, so I was also afraid of the ball since most of the guys were very, um, enthusiastic kickers.

Those of you who have been reading my blog may also notice that there aren’t any pictures of Korean Finn. As most of you know, her owners came and found her at the shelter. I was disappointed all day, but then I realized the perfect circle of action that had occurred. It would have been very hard to have a dog here, but I wanted to rescue her. I saved her from certain death long enough for her real owners to find her since the shelter was keeping her alive until I could come get her. It was the best resolution for everyone. 

I stayed at the shelter and ended up helping to walk the dogs- it’s kind of like giving them their last meal. Sad, but they get one last walk or two with a nice human before they meet the end.

Afterward, I went out to lunch with some of the other volunteers at a small restaurant that serves temple food. It is near a Buddhist temple. The food was very light and delicious, and the restaurant itself was beautiful inside, with hand-carved wooden tables and handmade earthen dishes. It was a nice antidote to the sadness of the shelter.   All of the food in the picture, plus tangerine tea and fresh local oranges afterwards, cost about $6 a person. The plate in front is my lotus rice. It came in a bundle with the leaf tightly wrapped around it.   On a final note, I spoke to Agnes about my return flight and the train trip is on!

Monsoon Season Hath Begun

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

No. more. rain. I am melting into a sticky puddle. Only 3 more weeks of hot, humid rain. Side note: apparently I live next to a small pond full of insane frogs. It sounds like they live in my bathroom (all 500 of them). On a related note, anyone know how to bomb a frog pond?

Second Week On Jeju

Sunday, March 7, 2010

The rain continues this weekend as it has throughout the week. I honestly can’t believe I’ve only been here  for a week and a half- it feels like it’s been a month. I really got thrown into a whole new life here pretty quickly without much of an adjustment period, but I’m kind of glad that it worked out that way. I’m finally getting into a routine at work (or at least getting a sense of what my routine will by like. My kids are adorable and, for the most part, pretty well-behaved. And if they aren’t then well, I have to remind myself that they are only five years old.

There is a nice view of Mt. Halla from my classroom window. Going to stores and restaurants and finding what I need is getting a little easier. I discovered Kimbap (kind of like Korean sushi). I can get it at the corner store for about $.80! Teaching is so much easier than I expected- all I have to do is follow their workbooks and make sure they do their homework (that’s right…the kindergartners have homework! Their constant need for attention and sharpened pencils is the most demanding aspect of my job. I love the small classes, though. A lot of other teachers here have much bigger classes (my biggest class has 8 students).

 I realized this week that being here just doesn’t feel as strange as it should. Maybe it’s because I have access to almost all of the same things that I did at home. I even watch the Daily Show every night and listen to NPR. I’ve been thinking a lot about how the internet is changing our conception of home and making it more difficult to actually separate ourselves from it. If I cut the cord and really disconnected from my life in the US, I think I would be having a much different experience. In a way, part of me is a little disappointed that the culture shock has been so mild, but there’s also no way that I’ll fight the natural  impulse to make my life here as similar to my life in the US as possible. In a lot of ways, I’m better off here. I have healthcare, access to extremely low-cost dental care, and an easy job that pays well. I’m also a lot more active- I’ve been walking everywhere (except for when I take dirt-cheap cabs) and I climbed a volcanic peak yesterday to take a few photos despite the rain.  Oh, and it’s also beautiful here (as soon as you get out of Jeju City). I also have time to focus on photography and hopefully writing this year. So….mission: make life in Korea like life in Vermont. Step 1: while at home, subsist on a diet of yogurt, cereal, toast, egg whites, and coffee. Step 2: acquire Golden Retriever. Yes, you read that correctly. Following the spirit of quickly jumping into life here, I have decided to adopt Goldie, a poor lost Golden Retriever who happened to be at a local shelter. I still haven’t met her since the shelter is only staffed once a week for 2 hours, but she appears to be a Korean mini-Finn. I think she might still be a puppy. I’ll find out next Saturday! I think Finn will be psyched to meet the new addition to our golden retriever family (John, if you’re reading this, I hope you are, too!) She needed to be rescued quickly, as she only had a day left to live when I read about her and quickly emailed shelter volunteers. No time to consult! It just felt like the right thing to do, and I was happy that fate seemed to have tossed me a new dog. If I see any other Goldens at the shelter(which is unlikely) there’s nothing I can do. I’m not planning on starting my own chapter of Golden Retriever Rescue of Korea.  

Today, I’m off to the Five Day Market with one of my co-workers. It’s still drizzling, but I plan on taking some photos there and hopefully acquiring some cool stuff for my apartment. I’ll add photos to yesterday’s (March 6) album.   I’ve been listening to Johnny Cash American III: Solitary Man and IV: The Man Comes Around all morning, which I haven’t listened to in a long time. It’s hitting me in a whole new way. Somehow it all seems sad, tearfully beautiful, and yet not morose. I am oddly uplifted.  

Learning Korean and Avoiding Fan Death

Saturday, June 26, 2010

Today I made some extra money by appearing as Resident Native English Speaker (I actually did nothing except listen to kids stumble over books in English in front of a crowded room and stamp these little booklets) at another English school. At this particular school, teachers go tothe students' houses for lessons, so the annual Market Day gives them a chance for them to get together and pretend to buy things with fake $1 bills.

I was planning to head down to Seogwipo (“Soggy-po” as the locals pronounce it, which has a distinct flavor that suits its southerly locale) this afternoon for a vigil/information session about a proposed naval base on Jeju (bad for coral, bad for “peace island,” bad for lots of reasons), but I was too exhausted to make the trek down there and then get back in time to watch the World Cup game at 11. Korea has been doing well and it’s sort of an event to go watch the games, even though I am normally the world’s least enthusiastic sports fan.

Koreans are just so proud and excited, it warms the heart.Well, that and the free-flowing soju.

I’m making a lot of progress with Korean. I don’t think I’ll try and learn anything more than some basic vocabulary words while I’m here, just because I’m not sure that the time and effort is matched by its general usefulness outside of Korea. I have managed to learn how to read, though, which is helpful since I can at least pick out words that are English cognates. Ahh, and the other reason that I was so tired today….Jeju mosquitoes! They seem to have a magical and devious ability to invade my apartment en masse even though I have screens.

My fan is equipped with a 2-hour timer to prevent death.  There is a theory widely accepted as fact in Korea (and nowhere else in the world) that a fan, left running all night as they often are by reasonable people wanting to be nicely chilled or at the very least not stifling hot in a nearly-windowless room such as mine causes certain death by stealing all the oxygen from sleeping people. Here are just a few theories as to exactly HOW fans pose an imminent threat:

  • That an electric fan creates a vortex, which sucks the oxygen from the enclosed and sealed room and creates a partial vacuum inside. This explanation violates the principle of conservation of matter, as indoor fans are not nearly powerful enough to change the air pressure by any significant amount.

 

  • That an electric fan chops up all the oxygen particles in the air leaving none to breathe. This explanation violates mass conservation and well-known properties of molecules and gases, particularly that known breakdown energy of oxygen molecules lies in the ultraviolet range. It also ignores the nearly universal human tendency to wake up whilst being suffocated in a moment of sleep. Moreover, the theory makes no justifications for how and why a person will not suffocate whilst awake in a room which contains an operating fan.

 

  • The fan uses up the oxygen in the room and creates fatal levels of carbon dioxide. An electric motor does not function by combustion; unlike a candle, the electric motor consumes energy supplied by the electricity, not from a fuel. The fan motor's commutator does produce a small amount of ozone during normal operation, however most AC powered fans use induction motors, whose brushless design eliminates any possible ozone production. Ozone can be fatal in high concentrations, but any normal room would never allow the gas to build up to lethal levels.

 

  • That if the fan is put directly in front of the face of the sleeping person, it will suck all the air away, preventing one from breathing. This explanation ignores both the fact that a fan attracts as much air to a given spot as it is removing from it, and the fact that most people point a fan towards themselves when using one, which causes air to move past the face but does not change the amount of air present.

  I would like to report I remain very much alive after several nights with my new fan.

Burn It All Down

Thursday, March 1, 2010

It’s been a busy couple of days for me, so I haven’t been writing very much. I moved into my apartment (finally) on Saturday and went to the Jeju Fire Festival yesterday which was thankfully not rained out.

I took a bus there, which was an adventure in itself.

It was really exciting just to see more more of Jeju besides the city. As soon as I stepped off the bus and saw Korean military men controlling the throngs of people with incomprehensible shouting, I was overcome with a reminder that not only am I in a foreign country, but a culture that is completely foreign in every way. My walk to the festival was an immediate barrage of crowded stalls selling strange, previously unencountered (unthought of, even) food. Silkworm pupa, anyone?

I wandered around the festival all day, eventually making my way up to the hill to see the haystacks that were later torched. There were booths set up near the hill where people could write wishes on little flags and attach them to the haystacks. I wanted to make a wish too, but of since I can’t write in Hangul, I decided that it wouldn’t really fit in. I was taking pictures of the haystacks when I was approached by a woman who appeared to be trying to tell me that I shouldn’t photograph the people who were praying, but then I realized that she was asking me to pray! It soon became clear that some Koreans wanted me to enact the part of a praying and pious foreigner. I have to admit, I had trouble looking solemn as I clasped my hands in “prayer”while  stifling laughter. Later, I met some other foreigners and went to get some squid- infused pancakes and soy/rice wine known as Mageoli. When it got dark there was a fireworks show and as they lit the haystacks, the smoke and fireworks merged spectacularly.