Russian Street Artist Turns Derelict Buildings Into Whimsical Creatures

‘the keeper of the keys’ by nomerz

‘glutton’, st. petersburg

a detail showing ‘glutton’s’ teeth made from trash

Russian street artist Nikita Nomerz uses graffiti to repurpose abandoned buildings, trees, and debris in various cities including his home town of Nizhniy Novgorod. Nomerz’s project involves traveling around Russia on a quest to find and transform these unwanted structures into strange, quirky characters.

A video showing the making of the ‘keeper of the keys’

via {designboom}

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Bottle Cap Cottage

Russian pensioner Olga Kostina has turned her tiny cottage in the remote town of Kamarchaga in the Siberian taiga, into architectural macrame. Inspired by traditional motifs, Olga has painstakingly nailed over 30,000 plastic bottle caps onto her house to create pixelated patterns, and plans to continue adding more until every wall is completely covered.

Commenter “wendywonderland” says it best:

“Our magic comes from within, inspired by the world we inhabit and the resources we stumble across. How to teach people to listen to the small voice that guides them to the plastic bottle caps, and allows them to be viewed as beautiful? ”

How to teach people, indeed. Thanks, Olga!

How would you transform your house into livable art?

(via designboom)

Street Artist Megx Turns Germany Into Legoland

Bridge Transformed into Giant LEGO Bricks by German Street Artist MEGX

A standard-issue gray overpass was designed to look like giant LEGO bricks by MEGX, a street artist whose graffiti is worth checking out. The concrete 250-square-meter bridge in Germany was transformed from boring concrete into a real-life legoland creation.

Bridge Transformed into Giant LEGO Bricks by German Street Artist MEGX

photo by MEGX

Bridge Transformed into Giant LEGO Bricks by German Street Artist MEGX

Photo by Lukas Pauer

The Wuppertal, Germany bridge was not transformed overnight graffiti — authorities and sponsors helped MEGX create the giant mural over the course of four weeks. Which is still not a lot of time...

via {design milk}